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Modern Missionary Mamas

Because you bear God's image everywhere.

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books

Life in the Armpit Podcast show notes

First, an apology to Barb: we recorded this 100 years ago, and then you politely pointed out that I said the wrong month in my intro…and I never fixed it. And because I never fixed, I didn’t post it. So there you go. I’m sorry for being simultaneously a perfectionist who cannot let things go and a lazy bum who won’t correct my own mistakes. I am an enigma.

Now, for the rest of you! As Barb and I were talking on the podcast, we talked about a LOT of sites and links. So here you go!

BOOKS:

If You Want to Walk on Water, You Have to Get Out of the Boat by John Ortberg

FREE/CHEAP KINDLE BOOKS: Don’t have a Kindle? You can get a free Kindle app for your tablet! Or your desktop computer! Or your laptop computer! So no excuses, okay? You can personalize most of these to get the kind of books YOU like. And if you feel guilty about getting a book for free, you can give the author a nice review in exchange (assuming you liked it). Mason Cooley said it best: “Reading gives us someplace to go when we have to stay where we are.”

BookBub

My Book Cave (love how specific they are about content!)

Amazon’s Top 100 Free Kindle Books

Project Gutenberg (good for classics)

Smashwords

Open Library

Feedbooks

ManyBooks

Need more? I always tell people that if you pay taxes where you come from, there’s no reason why you shouldn’t use the ebook collection from your library. Look into it! And if it doesn’t work out, you can sign up for Overdrive to check them out yourself. It’s gotta be cheaper than buying them.

PODCASTS:

You’re maybe saying, “Who has time to sit down in front of the computer for this?” It’s so easy to put podcasts on your phone now. Live in the now, ladies–and “the now” is podcasts that we’re pretending aren’t just what we’ve been doing for hundreds of years through radio. Downcast and Stitcher are pretty good apps, if you need one.

The Moth. Oh, how I love it. You’ll either laugh or cry. Both are good. These are true stories told by the people who lived them, and they’re amazing.

How I Built This : Barb mentioned this one. Like her, I am an information junkie, so I’ll put it on my list.

Wait Wait Don’t Tell Me: If you feel like you can’t keep up with the news (like me), this will help catch you up a little with a giggle thrown in for good measure. Caution: some of it is a bit crass for little ears, because, you know, politics.

Planet Money: This isn’t about your personal finances–it’s about how economies work. It’s about why you see blue pallets everywhere, it’s about why truffle oil is so expensive, it’s about why it takes so long to do online bank to bank money transfers. Curious yet?

New Heights Church: This church has been really intentional about blessing one of our programs in Indonesia, and that’s so cool to see. Their pastor, Matt Hannan, came to Idaho and did some training for us before we went to the field. Good stuff.

Andy Stanley: I’ve heard of him, but I haven’t listened to his stuff.

Craig Groeschel: I hadn’t heard of him. Maybe you haven’t either. Until now, obvs.

The Sporkful: Sounds like my kind of podcast, thought it might make me hungry, and as we all know, eating with earbuds in is just disgusting because you can hear yourself chewing. Oh, you’ve never tried that? Well…um…

Mud Stories with Jacque Watkins: The last one seems to be about technology tools for moms, so maybe less applicable where you are, but she also had Ann Voskamp, so…

God Centered Mom: I listened to this one so much when I first had Peter. She did one on anger that had me in tears, it was so transparent and just…true.

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My first devotional is here!

Hi mamas!

First of all, happy belated Resurrection Sunday. I hope you were able to celebrate and rest with your families, whatever that looked like for you. For us, it looked like deviled eggs (which my kids were just SURE were ‘doubled eggs’), plastic-egg-hiding, too much sugar, exuberant church sweating, significant sports-watching and kicking back to read. Good day.

Now, down to business: my first devotional is ready to be shared! I’m really excited about this. I’ve gotten some good feedback from a few people whom I’ve shared it with already, and I hope it’ll be a blessing to you.

In that vein, I’m going to go ahead and release it for free to you, dear mamas, for the rest of April. So spread the word! Re-post, blog it, tweet it, Instagram it, forward it on to a friend or colleague now! It’ll go up on Amazon after that, and while it won’t be expensive, free is better. (We know this, mamas. Free is always better.)

There’s three formats available:

  • Mobi: You can read this on a Kindle or in the Kindle app on your phone or computer.
  • Epub: This is what you want for any other e-reader (Nook, Kobo, etc.)
  • PDF: This is what you want if you just want to read it on your computer, most likely. It’s the most flexible, but not the prettiest way to read it. (Yes, I really just said that. I know. I know.)

Each day also has a link to a worship song, so it may be helpful to have a version that works on your phone or tablet, rather than an e-reader. Just something to keep in mind.

It’s also going to ask for your email–that’s just so that I can follow up with you and let you know if I do another one. It’ll be easy to unsubscribe if it gets annoying, and I’ll never give it out to anyone. I promise.

Here’s the link: BookHip.com/ZXRPHT

This was a labor of love for you, mamas. You’ve got this (book).

Free book alert!

This was recommended by Rachel Pieh Jones (and if you don’t know who she is, you should, because her blog is excellent). And it’s FREEEEEE, mamas! I know what free means to you this time of year. Go get it.

 

How to Help Toddlers Love Books

 

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How I Got My Toddler Back on Books After She Got a Taste of Screen Time

The struggle is real, mamas. Once those little people have a little taste of Dora the Explorer or Octonauts, there’s no going back. I’ve had some other moms ask me how I get my kids to read with me so much, and I thought this article had some good ideas. Here’s a few more:

-Start small. Maybe you can’t get through a whole book at first…choose a shorter one. A board book, maybe, that’s more tactile, with things to push or pull or touch. Then work your way up to longer ones.

-Choose appropriate books. Babybug and Hello magazines have some great little poems and rhymes, and you can get an iPad subscription now.  Don’t try to start them off with something heady or intellectual…there’s some rather academic picture books out there. Choose something sing-song, something memorable with interesting, colorful illustrations. Ebooks are okay, but most kids prefer to read on paper.

-Do the voices. Sure, I get that not everyone is comfortable with a dramatic reading, but come on, it’s a pretty friendly audience. Throw some silly voices in there and make it come alive!

-Put them on your lap. Kids love sitting with you more than anything, and it makes it easier to contain them, easier to see the pictures.

-Engage with the book. If it’s obvious you’re trying to get it over with as quickly as possible (what? No, I never do that at bedtime every night…), it’s pretty obvious to them. So go ahead and ask some questions. If the character is about to make a big decision, ask your child what they would do before you read what comes next. Have them make a prediction based on the title. Point out a little detail in the illustrations that the text doesn’t mention. Connect it to another book or life experience you’ve shared. Most of all, don’t ignore their questions! If you don’t know the answer, re-read to find out or look it up online.

-Choose books you liked as a kid. My own kiddos love to hear that this was a book Grandma read to me; it becomes more than learning. It’s tradition.

-Read nonfiction. Kids are curious about the world and love to know how to things work. When you hit the “why?” stage in preschool, nonfiction books are a nice outlet for that. And there is some AMAZING nonfiction out there now.

-Model for them. Kids want to be like you, right? (Trust me, they do.) So I let my kids see me reading books that are interesting to me, magazines, graphic novels, my Bible, a letter, anything. It makes reading part of your family culture, not just a school-type demand. Plus, it’s an excuse to put your feet up and ignore them for a few minutes in the name of good parenting! Win win.

You can totally raise a book lover. And it is so much easier if you start when they’re little!

You’ve got this, mamas.

#Momhack: Kids sitting through church

#MOMHACK

One of the ways I keep my kids happy in church is books. But I found that if I brought books with words in them, they always wanted me to read them. So the solution was…wordless books! And if you can, get actual paper books; it hasn’t worked well to take the tablet with us, as they inevitably want to play games instead of read.

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This is one of our favorites. It’s about flying frogs. David Wiesner has also written a book called Flotsam about a boy who finds a camera that took pictures underwater of hidden worlds. And a more recent offering is Free Fall about a boy’s magical dreams, and it was a Caldecott Honor book. (Caldecott is an award for excellence in illustrations…you can see an example of the medal in the picture above.)

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One book that has a more spiritual aspect is Noah’s Ark by Peter Spier.

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This one has some humor that older kids will pick up on, like how there’s two rabbits when they get on and about 100 when they get off. 🙂 His illustrations are very thought-provoking with some beautiful details.

When my littles were little-little, they also loved Good Dog, Carl. The mom goes out (!!) leaving the dog in charge (?!), and he has to keep the little girl from getting into trouble (…?!!?!?). Ok, so the premise is a little “old-school,” but it’s pretty cute. But also, don’t do any play dates at Alexandra Day’s house, mmkay?

I haven’t read this one, but it’s going on my Christmas list…to quote from someone who’s read it, “Two stories and two cultures are told simultaneously in one book. The stories appear side by side as the reader turns the pages at the same time. Mirror follows a typical day of two boys on opposite sides of the world. The stories take place in Sydney, Australia, and Morocco, North Africa.” Amazing, right?

And last but DEFINITELY not least, if you need a wordless book for an older kid who’s struggling with reading, I highly recommend The Arrival by Shaun Tan.

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Mamas, I got this book from the library on furlough, and I stayed up until midnight reading it. I’m usually asleep by 10:00…and y’all know how precious sleep is. It’s that good. And third culture kids will really connect with the story of a man entering a culture that seems completely foreign to him for the sake of his family. It’s so true to the emotions of moving to a new place, but I think anyone could enjoy it.

And apparently, I have good taste, because all the books I recommended are also on this list of Reading Rockets’ Favorite Wordless Picture Books. 

Note: I put in a bunch of links. That’s just for your convenience. I don’t profit in any way, so buy them wherever you want. 🙂

Maybe now we can get through worship without having to step out, eh? You’ve got this, mamas.

Vegetable gardening in the tropics

http://journeytoforever.org/farm_library/AD9.pdf

http://journeytoforever.org/farm_library/TropicalVegetableGardening.pdf

These are fairly thorough books on vegetable gardening in the tropics…not necessarily an easy topic to find information on. Tropical Permaculture has also been a helpful website for me.

Happy growing, mamas!

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